Tag: Frugal

Cutting Costs: Project Water

cutcostswaterWater bills are tricky, so much of the costs relates to the infrastructure more so than the actual usage costs, making it often a tricky place to save money. That said there are other reasons for reducing water usage other than saving money. Maybe you’re using tank water as your supply and thus rely on a finite amount of water, or maybe you prefer to use an environmentally sustainable amount of water.

As with all Cutting Cost tips you may find that not all of the tips offered suit you or your lifestyle but I’d rather be thorough with listing tips in the greatest hope of helping the most amount of people. Adopting even one of these tips will hopefully help you reduce some of your expenses.

  1. Collect water while waiting for hot water to come through the system. Once the habit is formed its easy to remember to have a container ready for collecting the cold water while awaiting the hot water to come through before having a shower or doing the dishes. Most times I collect around 2L of water which provides plenty of drinking water for myself throughout the day. I don’t tend to drink the water collected while waiting for the shower to warm up because our older taps imbue a coppery taste. Instead I use that water for filling up the cistern after flushing the toilet.
    Saving = 2-4L/day 14-28L/Week 728-1456L/year
    Potential yearly saving=$2.55-$5.11
  2. Collect and redistribute grey water. This tip can be dependent on your location as some local councils don’t allow grey water usage. Grey water is considered water that has previously been used, it’s things like your bath or  laundry water which can be reused particularly in the garden. Utilising grey water does need to be done with caution as the detergents used may be detrimental to the environment. Grey water is great for helping keep your lawn green but caution is recommended if you decide to use it for watering fruit or vegetable crops.
    Saving = 70-980L/week 3,640-50,000L/year (calculated from efficient model with once a week runtime up to a less water efficient model and daily washing)
    Potential yearly saving= $12.77-$175.50
  3. Reduce your shower time. If reducing the amount of time spent in the shower isn’t feasible, can you turn the taps off while soaping up? We have a shower inside a bathtub allowing me to collect the water for Little Mister to have his bath at the same time I shower.
    Saving= 7L/minute 49-98L(or even more time reduced)/week 2,548-5,096
    Potential yearly savings=$8.94-$17.88 per person (5 person household could be up to $89 saving or more per year)
  4. Turn that tap off when you don’t need it. This is the basic advice – you don’t need the tap running while you are brushing your teeth for example.
    Savings= 5L/minute 140-280L/week 7,280-14,560L/year
    Potential yearly savings=$25.55-$51.10
  5. Check for leaks. Check your water meter and jot down the number it is at. Then use no water for an hour and recheck the number – if it has increased you likely have a leak somewhere. Sometimes this isn’t a feasible means of checking, for example if you are reliant on tank water or live in older units with a shared meter.
    Savings=100-500L/week 5,200-26,000L/year
    Potential yearly savings=$18.25-$91.26
  6. Install water efficient appliances. Washing machines, shower heads, toilet cisterns and taps all have more water efficient counterparts. Whilst the initial outlay may seem counterproductive, they will make their cost back over time due to the difference in savings from water (and possibly electricity) bills.
    Savings=2L/min 14-28L/week 728-1,456L/year or more if multiple appliances are installed. Added benefit – if you are renting out a property water efficient appliances are required in order to pass the water usage charges onto the tenants.
    Potential yearly savings $2.55-$5.11
  7. Don’t buy bottled water. Not quite a water bill slashing idea as it will add extra usage to your bill – however comparatively a 600ml bottle of water usually costs between $1-$3 depending on where you buy it. 600mls of water will set you back approximately 0.002c and also will help you reduce your footprint on the environment.
    Savings = environment and loads of $$
    Potential yearly savings = $1,092-$3,276 based on 3 bottles (1.8L) per day.

So while individually it is seemingly a minor reduction in the bills – from a worst case scenario it’s possible to save up to $365 off your yearly total – or almost $100 per quarter – and up to $3,500 if you stop buying disposable water bottles and instead invest in a decent reusable water bottle. Not to mention the benefits the above tips would all have on the environment long term.

Savings $$ calculations are based on the value of a kilolitre being $3.51 as per my latest water bill (in Brisbane in 2017) on the lowest tier. Averages of how many litres appliances use found through internet searches.

Do you have any water reduction tips?
Have you had success dropping the price of a water bill?


Don’t forget to check out other articles in the ‘Cutting Costs’ series!

Frugal Fortunes & Fumbles: FFF#10

fortunefumble

 

Each week I like to look back at the week that was and reflect on whether or not I am still undertaking steps to get me to my financial goals. I am not superhuman and as such I have my fumbles as well as my fortunes and I think it’s important to learn from my mistakes as well as my successes.

 

Fortunes

  • Maccas is currently running a monopoly game which gives you the opportunity to win some freebies. Little Mr and I often clean up rubbish on our walks around the neighbourhood and we’ve picked up a few of the game pieces from the rubbish. I’ve enjoyed a few free coffees as well as a sundae and cheeseburger – with the added side of feeling good for removing rubbish from the environment.
  • I came in under budget on the grocery shopping for the second month in a row. This month I used 93% of the budget compared to 81% the previous month. I’m hoping to be much further under budget this month as I aim to reduce my inventory.
  • We’ve been getting out of the house more recently which should reduce our electricity bill slightly.

Fumbles

  • I’ve fallen far behind in doing my surveys lately, resulting in less gift cards to pay for my groceries. This gives me a second incentive for reducing my inventory at the moment.

Frugal Fortunes & Fumbles: FFF#9

fortunefumble

 

Each week I like to look back at the week that was and reflect on whether or not I am still undertaking steps to get me to my financial goals. I am not superhuman and as such I have my fumbles as well as my fortunes and I think it’s important to learn from my mistakes as well as my successes.

 

Fortunes

  • I got a great deal on the most expensive component of my homemade version of cereal, allowing me to maximise my savings.
  • Following Little Mr’s anemia diagnosis I received an easy pate recipe from a friend that made almost 2kgs of pate. I looked up the shops price of pate and it’s around $30/kg – since the ingredients all cost less that $8 – including electricity etc I saved around $50! Bonus is getting a delicious pate in which I know exactly what went into it.
  • It was time to buy some more bird crumble. I discovered that one of the two packets at the pet shop was actually expired. I asked if I could get a discount on it and they gave me 50% off! A saving of $15, and there is NO difference to the budgies.
  • There have been some great specials on yogurt at the shops lately which I took great advantage of considering it’s one of the few things guaranteed to be eaten by Little Mr.

Fumbles

  • Little Mr stressful hospital visit resulted in maccas for lunch.
  • We have slightly gone overboard with the groceries this month. Not yet over budget however a no spend week is in order.

Cutting Costs: Project Cereal

cereal2.jpg

I’m picky when it comes to cereal. Ever since I was a kid, light ‘n’ tasty was the only cereal I never got bored of ⅓ of the way into the box (sorry mum!). I dislike porridge and always have, weet-bix gets soggy and gross… but combination cereals, like just right and sultana bran are my kinds of cereal! However… they’re expensive and more often than not the box image expectation and the reality of what’s inside the box leave me totally disappointed.

Solution: make your own cereal!

Now I’m not saying this is the cheapest way to eat cereal, but I find it is the cheapest way to eat this type of cereal, and you can chop and change it entirely to your tastes.

 

I don’t have a set recipe and each batch I make is slightly different but the basic elements I try to include are

  • Corn flakes
  • Rolled oats
  • Weet bix
  • Rice bubbles
  • A combination cereal like light n tasty
    Optional extras:
  • Dessicated coconut
  • Sultanas

Honestly you can use any cereal you have available to you but it’s the quantity of what that averages the cost out for you. For example I use the cheapest of everything available to me (yes, even the cardboard tasting home brand weet-bix!)

Instead of paying around $7/kg for combination cereal, if I combine the following in complete packet sizes-

Combination cereal 770g = $5
Corn flakes 550g =$2
Rice pops 400g =$2
Rolled oats 750g=$1.19
Weet bix 1kg=$2.86

It comes out at
=3.475kg/$13.05=$3.75/kg
Which is by itself a $2.70 saving per kg however, that’s not the quantities I use.

The rough quantities I use are closer to as follows-

10% combination cereal =(.64c)
30% weet bix (crushed)=(.85c)
20% corn flakes=(.72c)
10% rice bubbles=($.50)
30% rolled oats=(.48c)

Or $3.19/kg a saving of more than 50% of store bought combination cereal!

Of course adding sultanas and dessicated coconut bumps the unit cost up a tad, but still it is much cheaper than a store bought version and if times are lean I can tailor the cereal to be cheaper again by increasing more of the cheaper ingredients and less of the expensive ones. The price can also be reduced by buying the cereals in bulk quantities while they are on special, or sometimes stores have multi-buys (such as 3 for $5 instead of $2 each for homebrand corn flakes and rice pops).

For the actual making part I just layer them all into a airtight container and then – to my sons amusement – shake it all up, and serve.

Have you tried making your own cereal?
What ingredients do you include?

Frugal Fortunes & Fumbles: FFF#7

fortunefumble

Each week I like to look back at the week that was and reflect on whether or not I am still undertaking steps to get me to my financial goals. I am not superhuman and as such I have my fumbles as well as my fortunes and I think it’s important to learn from my mistakes as well as my successes.

 

Fortunes

  • I got a few DVD rentals for free with some promo codes for entertainment this week.
  • Extra repayments on the mortgage meant the end of month mortgage interest was reduced by $1.11 a day compared to last month – down $5.76 a day from January!

Fumbles

  • No fumbles that I can think of this week aside from spending more time indoors than I would have liked, increasing the electricity usage.

PSA: Huggies Little Swimmers Freebie

sample-banner-2_normal

Free Sample (Up to 2 per year) For Huggies Little Swimmer pants.

https://www.huggies.com.au/samples/little-swimmers

I have been told by a swimming instructor that these pants don’t actually contain wee, but just catch poo from escaping. This means if your little one doesn’t poo onto these swimpants you could in theory dry the swimpants in the sun until they look worse for wear. So if you only have the occasional swimmer this could make a packet of these pants last much longer.

Frugal Fortunes & Fumbles: FFF#6

fortunefumble

Each week I like to look back at the week that was and reflect on whether or not I am still undertaking steps to get me to my financial goals. I am not superhuman and as such I have my fumbles as well as my fortunes and I think it’s important to learn from my mistakes as well as my successes.

 

Fortunes

  • Once again I’ve been filling some spare time by listening to free audiobooks courtesy of my Library.
  • We started creating a picture book using brochures from out local shopping centre. This was prompted when I realised Little Mister could point out a cartoon frog picture but not recognise a real frog picture.
  • Once again came in under $50 budget for groceries. I could have gotten by without any expenditure this week however on one of my Coles perusal visits I came across 3kg of beef mince for $4.80/kg (usually $7/kg) I’ve since frozen the meat for future meals.

Fumbles

  • The bike seat I mentioned last week ended up costing a little bit as I discovered I didn’t have the necessary extension pieces to mount the seat onto my bike. Still a win overall but not quite the free seat I thought it was last week. The fortune of this ‘fumble’ is that Mr FIM (Mr FID?) convinced me to wait till he was home so we could get an extra discount he was entitled to.
  • I made some homemade icecream with a bargain milk and cream I purchased, sounds like a Fortune, only I then worked the maths and discovered it was actually cheaper to buy store bought icecream! Maybe not quite as tasty as homemade, but cheaper yes. I’m surprised at how cheap the store bought icecream is!